10+2 Mobile Investor Relations apps to help you plan yours

10+2 Mobile Investor Relations apps to help you plan yours

For most corporations, a mobile app catering for the investors’ voracious appetite for information is still considered a luxury. However, such an app makes perfect sense as not only does it make information available 24/7, but also it plants your brand in the hands of your target audience. Below we are exploring 10 such apps as well as 2 additional corporate apps that are not aimed at investors but still worth looking at for their exceptional user experience.

 

Unilever

This is one of the best looking apps. It is fast, simple, slick and rich in content. It makes great use of video and keeps PDFs to a minimum.

 

 

TVlogic

This app, probably created for the South Korean market, is rich in content, formats, as well as attitude. Although not the best looking app out there, it uses strong graphics that make browsing a more tactile experience.

 

 

Shell

This is probably the most content rich app we reviewed; there are heaps of content for even the most demanding audiences. It is also very strongly branded, although the rich design detail gets in the way of browsing; it feels a bit claustrophobic, like a website has been forcefully squeezed into a tiny screen leaving no breathing space.

 

 

Stanley Black&Decker

This is an app whose design and content leave quite a lot to be desired. The content is basic, there is heavy dependency on PDFs and there is limited use of video. The branding is weak, the design language confused and the signposting barely visible.

 

 

Nestle

This app has good content but the design feels generic. The design language that can be summed up as “overly sculpted blue bars” is too strong and suffocates the content sandwiched in between. Despite their strength, the blue bars have little to do with the Nestle brand, and lack sophistication and individuality.

 

 

ENEA

A basic app, promising little and delivering just that. The red text is quite tricky to read on a grey background, but apart from that it just works.

 

 

Dixons

This app is based on a platform used by a number of companies we reviewed and although simple and slick, it is nothing more than a PDF index facility.

 

 

Caterpillar

A basic app heavily dependent on PDFs.

 

 

Allianz

This app is well designed, simple and easy to use, but the design language veers towards the generic doing no favours to Allianz’s brand. The content is rich and comes in various formats.

 

 

Walmart

Surely this cannot be the IR app of one of the worlds biggest corporations! I guess they didn’t get there by wasting money on fancy mobile apps!

 

 

MAN (the first +1)

This is not an investor ielations app, but a mobile corporate brochure. It has been included on this list because of its exceptional design, attention to detail, content richness and format variety. There is no reason why an investor relations app can’t have such a strong visual impact. Yes, the trucks look good, but this comprehensive presentation of the company is capable of satisfying more than just the petrol-heads.

 

 

Audi (the second +1)

The Audi app is not an investor relations app either, but it sits diametrically opposite the IR apps above in the user experience spectrum. It offers the richest and most interactive interface and has no resemblance to the standard mobile app interface. As with Man, Audi has sexy products and the marketing budget to match them. This app makes a bold statement all brands featured above could learn from.

 

 

If you are planning your organisation’s Investor Relations mobile app, it is worth downloading some of the examples mentioned above and reviewing not only the content included but the formats, navigation and design language that help make an app an indispensable source of information for the target audience and a bold brand ambassador for you.

 

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